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Old 04-11-2015, 02:55 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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Default CRTC study of internet as regulated service(april 2015)

In the United States of America, Internet is now regulated under Title2(common carrier). That means that regulation is used to control providers so they don't damage their customers communications with interfering network management. Hopefully it will also lead to preventing the scraping of customers traffic by the ISP. The ISP scrapes in order to sell that information to third parties, for more profits. In the law, it's called 'unlawful wiretapping'. Certain ISP's are already filing lawsuits, because certain ISP's are butthurt about loss of billions of dollars in greedy profit.
http://arstechnica.com/business/2015...-and-title-ii/

On the side, the latest on the coming legal system nightmare called the 'Trans Pacific Partnership' has written that a corporation(foreign or domestic) can sue a country for interfering in future profits. That interference in the documents is judged to be their hated nemesis known as protecting the environment, protecting consumer Rights, protecting workers Rights and protecting Human Rights.
https://www.reddit.com/r/worldnews/c...osal_allowing/



Mandating Internet as a 'basic communications service' should result in modification of network management that is designed to punish users(traffic shaping) who attempt to use the network as the internet intended.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_Canada

Criteria for full regulations would depend on how you use that internet connection. VOIP, Email, Video Chat, Schooling, and other important communications. If you can't purchase more data for a reasonable cost and instead get throttled to useless, that should be a violation. Overrides to comply with 'basic communications' during throttle, would be needed to not interfere with VOIP, schooling, email, video chat.


If this whole review ends up being nothing but a large welfare check to the ISP who then decides to not invest it in the network, it would be nice if there is punishments(prison time) for the Executives of the ISP for ignoring what the money was intended to be spent on.



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...ticle23872372/
Quote:
Canada’s telecom regulator is kicking off what will be more than a year-long examination of what constitutes a basic level of communications services.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) said Thursday it will seek input from Canadians in two separate phases this year and hold a public hearing next April.

The review, which will focus heavily on rural and remote areas, will consider a range of issues including the question of whether broadband (or high-speed) Internet should be deemed a “basic telecommunications service.”
If you are not getting at least 5Mbps down and 1Mbps up, on a consistent basis, you are not on broadband(highspeed interet). GB per month is another problem with the fast speeds, small caps and expensive overages.
http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2014/03/broadband-targets/

Quote:
At the time, the commission did establish target speeds of 5 megabits per second (Mbps) for downloading and 1 Mbps for uploading and stated that such speeds should be available to all Canadians by the end of 2015.

CRTC commissioner Jean-Pierre Blais has since suggested that access to high-speed services could one day be considered a basic service.


Telesat, the backdoor controller of satellite internet in Canada. Owns the Anik F2, F3. Has a ownership share portion of the ViaSat1. And whatever deal with Hughesnet...
ViaSat2(and Hughesnet Echostar19) is scheduled to launch in mid 2016. Bringing coverage to most of Canada by late 2016, including the far north where they rely on the old(2005) Anik F2 for internet service.

Quote:
The report, prepared by CRTC commissioner Candice Molnar, found that communities dependent on satellites for Internet access rely almost exclusively on Telesat’s satellite network.

The CRTC said it will hold a separate public consultation to review Telesat’s current price ceiling, based on Molnar’s recommendations, to determine whether the ceiling is “still appropriate in light of current market conditions and future projections.”
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Last edited by buttitchi : 04-11-2015 at 05:50 PM.
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