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  #1  
Old 07-18-2015, 08:49 PM
H3ADShOt3 H3ADShOt3 is offline
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Default Dsl Line In a Lake?

My driveway is 2400ft and I'm currently with the xplornet 4g satellite and the latency is way too much for us. Last week East Link came over to do an estimate and they said it was going to be 34 000$ to install it. I'm obviously not going to pay for that. When we first built the house bell came over to see if they could install their Dsl lines and the tech said the driveway would be too long and the lines would break because of the frost. I do live on a lake and on the other side of the lake they have bell services (dsl again). From the distance from my house to my nearest neighbor is about 2200ft. Would anybody know if bell would lay the lines in the lake?
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Old 07-18-2015, 09:48 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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If you like to do it yourself along the driveway, hire a trencher from the rental store for a couple of days and put in 1-1/4" electrical conduit(schedule 40 PVC).
The Telco/Cableco will have its own rules listed somewhere for what conduit size they will pull their heavier gauge wires through.

rona.ca/en/electrical-conduit-3767060--1

Depth of pipe will depend on any local regulations. Lets guess some costs: $2500 for the pipe. $300 for the trencher(chain saw or larger slice blade). Put in 2 pull ropes, $200, 1 spare for any new lines to be pulled. 4 junction boxes, $70, along the line to ensure no problems with the pull.


I don't know what the price may be for submarine-cable. With that, it would need to be put into a legal easement under the public/private lake to ensure future compliance and needing to avoid anyone hooking it and pulling it up.


Another choice is if you know your neighbor across the lake real good. Put in a wifi router repeater(outdoor enclosure for easy access) and create an account at their address under your name. Modem/bridge-router at their house with a directional antenna and points at yours with another directional antenna. A bit more work to figure out and to keep secure(plus needed reboots and things).
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Last edited by buttitchi : 07-18-2015 at 09:59 PM.
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  #3  
Old 07-19-2015, 09:29 AM
H3ADShOt3 H3ADShOt3 is offline
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Okay so let's just go thru this real quick, I can most likely do the trench by renting an excavator, buy the conduit and the junctions boxes. But now I'm trying to wrap my head around how we would actually lay the cable. Does the provider get me the cable and I do the whole installation with him (not an option for East Link) or get my own cable put it in, bury the trench and then get a provider to come and hook me up?
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Old 07-19-2015, 01:36 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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That's why you need the installation specs from your chosen provider, so to avoid issues at hookup. You don't want to install the cable and find signal loss makes it useless. The full build $$ markup by some companies, sucks. A cable push/pull down pre-installed conduit is a quick job.
2400 feet is a long run. You have to ensure slack at the ends for the hookups.



Cable Coaxial, you'll need to know the specs of the cable to avoid signal loss from the pole to the home. And it can run a higher price dependent on the cable specs. The length of that cable will come on a large spool to avoid it being kinked. A Cableco arrangement can just show up with a spool truck and initially push it, then pull it down your conduit. $2500 for the cable as a low end estimate price.



Telco, you''ll want at least 4 twisted pairs in the line(8 twisted pairs is better for spares), along with the gauge of wire(20-22). Phone line is probably the cheapest route(est. $1500 to start). A non-aerial cable that is pulled in conduit doesn't fully need the hang cable built in. If it also has a metal stiffener, it will come on a large spool.
2500 feet from the dslam is the max limit for 25Mbps on Vdsl. Approximately 6500 feet is the limit for 15Mbps on Adsl. If Bell does any type of line bonding(2 pairs), 2 Vdsl 15Mbps pairs will get you 25Mbps.
Cable specs are things like PE22(aerial without carrier cable imbedded). PE38(aerial hanging cable embedded). PE89(direct burial grade).


A optimal condition would be if Bell can do a fibre optic connection to their fibre fed dslam. That may be a business department question.
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Last edited by buttitchi : 07-19-2015 at 01:47 PM.
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  #5  
Old 07-19-2015, 06:57 PM
H3ADShOt3 H3ADShOt3 is offline
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Alright thanks I'll see what I can do.
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  #6  
Old 07-24-2015, 10:33 PM
H3ADShOt3 H3ADShOt3 is offline
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So is that PVC piping going to protect the telephone lines from the frost or only cable?
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Old 07-24-2015, 11:55 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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It should be able to house both services. Low voltage wire sharing is what it's called.

To the trench you can add some sand around the pipe to help buffer the conduit from the native soils/rocks that move in the freeze.

Some will like a 2" conduit(at double the price of 1 1/4", so might as well lay 2 pipes) for the extra room to pull the cables(cable size dependent). As long as the initially installed pull lines don't get tangled, it should be easy enough with inch and a quarter, including some access boxes along the line just in case. Make a little jig to keep the pull lines untwisted when installing, or send the second pull line down during install of the first communication company's service lines.
Easy way to install the string with a vacuum. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIqzyr8HAiI

This PDF is a Telus install guide for fibre optics. The 1 1/4 conduit, they will push a flex conduit inside that contains their service lines.
http://about.telus.com/servlet/JiveS...quirements.pdf



Is your electrical service overhead, or is it buried? If you have poles, that's a bucket truck and being on private land, 13' 9" height clearances could be fudged.
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  #8  
Old 07-25-2015, 09:47 AM
H3ADShOt3 H3ADShOt3 is offline
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Yes I was going to add some sand around the pipes because we do have some big rocks.

Now for the electrical service it is underground.
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