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  #1  
Old 01-08-2013, 10:27 PM
uott299 uott299 is offline
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Angry No service for almost 2 months

I just had a bad experience with Xplornet. Lost signal in October, they created a work order and said someone would call me. No one called so I called back. They said they will look into. No one called. Same thing over and over again. Long story short I finally had a service person come out in December. The problem was the original install did not ground the dish properly. It was grounded to the gas line (electricity and gas???) and was not attached anymore. The service guy said this was bad news and properly rerouted the ground to the electrical panel in the basement. He said he had to charge $75 but I should try to get it back.
The service guys at xplornet did not agree, they gave me the run around that it was the corroded connectors and they are not on warranty. Corroded connectors that were 3 months old (I only just had the service installed in late spring).
What a bunch of BS. Oh by the way they did not charge me for the no service (whop de do) but they sure made a point of telling me this, like I could have been charged for no service!!!
There service sucks and they charge for every little thing they can. They say no charge installation yet it cost $200 for connection fees???
So I must have the the worst service ever (maybe not) for internet service.
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  #2  
Old 01-08-2013, 10:52 PM
wd40 wd40 is offline
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I tell you, this company just cannot be trusted or believed.
I have had a bit of a run in with Xplornet to the point that I am filing a formal complaint with the regulatory bodies.
This company literally bully's and lies, tries very hard to intimidate, threaten and harass it's customers and hangs the "collections threat" over the customers heads!
What a bunch of crap - time that everyone started to stand up against this type of behaviour.

Rant off - thanks
wd40
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  #3  
Old 01-15-2013, 01:04 PM
REPO REPO is offline
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This is just some facts, and in no way am I saying Xplornet is right here.

The gas line is an acceptable grounding device. All electrical panels in homes (in Canada anyway) are grounded to the gas line, as well as a ground plate. So if he just moved it from the gas line to the panel, he really didn't change anything. If the installer said that it was wrong, he obviously doesn't understand the Canadian electrical code.
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  #4  
Old 01-15-2013, 01:57 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REPO View Post
This is just some facts, and in no way am I saying Xplornet is right here.

The gas line is an acceptable grounding device. All electrical panels in homes (in Canada anyway) are grounded to the gas line, as well as a ground plate. So if he just moved it from the gas line to the panel, he really didn't change anything. If the installer said that it was wrong, he obviously doesn't understand the Canadian electrical code.
The gas line is to be 'bonded to ground' ,, but is never to be used as a ground device.

The bonding to ground is to avoid electrical shock from a pipe that could become energized by accident electricity.

If a product grounded to a gas line were to discharge a large enough load it could feasibly cause an arc depending on conditions and thats bad.

The satellite internet dish coax are grounded to avoid a static buildup that can cause issues.
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Last edited by buttitchi : 01-15-2013 at 02:03 PM.
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  #5  
Old 01-15-2013, 02:06 PM
REPO REPO is offline
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Yes, this is correct, that is why I said it needed a ground plate as well. But the panel does indeed need to be grounded to the gas line.
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  #6  
Old 01-15-2013, 02:16 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REPO View Post
Yes, this is correct, that is why I said it needed a ground plate as well. But the panel does indeed need to be grounded to the gas line.
The gas line --> grounds to --> electrical panel ground --> ground.
Or
The gas line --> grounds to --> panel ground --> ground.

Not: the electrical panel --> grounds to --> gas line.

Direction of flow of electricity and all that.

An installer could slam a new 6 foot ground rod down for just the dish itself to avoid tieing into the house at all.

Also to get a ground on a gas line you have to puncture the paint protection to get a ground, which can lead to corrosion based on differing metals and moisture.

There is also ground plates(about 8" by 16") that are dug down 2 feet and that is the ground. There is an occasional issue with the depth of the plate when extreme dry soil conditions make the ground iffy. But apparently it stills gives a good ground.

edit: some images of a ground plate.
http://www.free-ed.net/sweethaven/Bl....asp?iNum=0104
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Last edited by buttitchi : 01-15-2013 at 02:28 PM.
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  #7  
Old 01-15-2013, 02:42 PM
buttitchi buttitchi is offline
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Should also add that the coax connectors should be water proofed in some way. Butyl rubber tape is one of them. Some use connectors with rubber gaskets in side, along with butyl tape. Dielectric grease in the connectors.

From the thread on DSLreports
https://secure.dslreports.com/forum/...ed.-What-to-do.

Hughesnet install guidelines. PDF: Lots of pictures:
https://secure.dslreports.com/r0/dow...d%20blocks.pdf


Things to not bound to: It wants any new ground rod to be tied into the house ground for consistency.
DO NOT ATTACH GROUND CONDUCTOR TO:
• Conduit on the load side of a service enclosure e.g. or 1 inch conduit used for lights, switches, outlets etc.
• Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC) Cutoff switch and chassis enclosures or condensation pipes.
• Lightning conductors. ( Lightning rods and protection circuits).
• Driven Ground Rods unless the Ground Rod is bonded to the building’s power grounding electrode system.
• Steel roof trusses unless they are bonded to grounded building structural steel.
• Metal roofs or screws securing metal roofs.
• Metal Screens or Windows.
• Vents or Vent Pipes.
• Gas Pipes.
• Gutters.

Ground points:
Ground Electrode / “Ground Point” – Based upon Articles 250 , 810.21 (F), and 820.100 (B) of the NEC.

Nearest accessible location on the following:

• Grounded Structural Steel Member (Figure 6) – Normally found in commercial buildings. You can usually verify that the
structural steel is grounded by looking for a large grounding conductor attached to a steel beam or column near the main
service panel where the power enters the building.

• Service Equipment Enclosure (Figure 7 & 8) – Commercial and Residential buildings. The outside of the breaker panel or
meter box wher the servie enters the building. Connecting the ground wire to the Service Equipment Enclosure must not
damage or change the integrity of the enclosure.

• Grounded Interior Metal Water Pipe (Figure 4) – The ground wire must be connected to a point within 5 feet of where the
water service enters the building. (Exception – Industrial, commercial, and institutional buildings where conditions of
maintenance or supervision ensure that only qualified personnel service the installation, interior metal water piping located
more than 5 feet from the point of entrance can be used as part of the grounding electrode system, provided that the
entire length, other than short sections passing through walls floors or ceilings, is exposed.)

• Metallic Power Service Raceway (Figure 9 & 10) – The metal conduit / raceway providing power to the main service panel.

• Building Ground Conductor (Figure 11) - The main ground conductor or the ground electrode of a building’s disconnecting
means (the ground electrode (wire) that is attached to main service panel or disconnect switch).
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Last edited by buttitchi : 01-15-2013 at 05:36 PM.
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  #8  
Old 11-07-2013, 06:44 PM
geb_1970 geb_1970 is offline
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Default I used to feel your pain

Wow I really don't miss Xplornot and Storm. Started with Storm then they just ignored their customers when the water tower was destroyed. Never telling them that there would be no service and still charging them. After so many complaints from the area they decided to sell to Xplornot. Started OK but then lost signals then payed 200$ for Hughesnet dish with FAP after 650 MB. Wow I don't miss those shitty ISP. Luckily Bell Fibe arrived 2 years ago in my rural area. Don't get me wrong I would never sign with Bell. Found out that teksavvy buys Bell service and then sell the service for a fraction of what Bell will charge. Been happy every since. But I felt your pain.

Fuck you Xplornet and Storm
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